Click here to go to our Baseball home page!
 70s
 80s
 90s
BC 
Google
BaseballChronology Entire Web
AS | Awards | Hall | Leaders | Leagues | Parks | People | Postseason | Seasons | Teams



Quotable!
"Why did you cross the road?"
--Skip Carey, Atlanta Braves announcer - when introduced to the San Diego Chicken

 

Brooklyn Excelsiors

By Patrick Mondout

The Excelsior Base Ball Club of Brooklyn (popularly known as the Brooklyn Excelsiors) were a mid-19th Century team and founding member of the National Association of Base Ball Players (NABBP), the first national baseball organization.

At a glance...
BROOKLYN EXCELSIORS
Club Facts
Established December 8, 1854
Disbanded  (after 1893)
Located Brooklyn
Uniform
Blue pants with white cord; white shirts
trimmed with blue, and the letter "E" in
German text over the chest; white cap,
trimmed with blue cord at the bottom
and blue braid at the top, white visor;
belt, white enameled leather with the
word Excelsior in old English
Officials
(See below)
Year by Year Results
  W L T
1856  1 1  
1857 1 2  
1858 8 5  
1859 12 3  
1860 18 2 1
1861 (No matches)
1862 4 1 1
1863 5 4  
1864 8 3  
1865 4 3  
1866 13 6 1
1867 11 5  
1868 4 5 1
1869 5 7  
1870 5 3 1
Affiliations
NABBP (1857-1870)
Pennants
NABBP None
Nicknames
Excelsior of Brooklyn
Ballparks
Excelsiors grounds, corner of Smith
and Degraw in Brooklyn (1856-57)
Carroll Park (a vacant field bounded by
Hoyt, Smith & President streets & Carroll
Place in South Brooklyn) (1858)

The Excelsiors had the best record in 1860 and were one of the strongest teams from the late 50s to the mid 60s. The team might have been considered the team of the 1860s had not the Civil War and fate intervened. (That distinction went instead to their rivals, the Atlantics.)

See also: National Association of Professional Base Ball Players, Defunct Leagues, 'Early Baseball' Terminology.

Their best shot came in 1860, when they split the first of three with the Brooklyn Atlantics and were leading 8-6 in the deciding game before a rowdy Atlantics crowd intervened and forced the umpire to declare it a draw. The teams never met again.

Ill-fated pitcher James Creighton was perhaps the biggest star of his day and was ably caught by Joe Leggett until the Creighton's in-season death in 1862. The roster decimated by the Civil War and without their superstar pitcher, the Excelsiors were never again legitimate contenders for the championship.

Remarkably, future Cincinnati Red Stockings ace Asa Brainard was an outfielder with the Excelsiors during the time and replaced Creighton as their pitcher and Future Hall of Fame pitcher Candy Cummings joined the team in 1866.

They subsequently added future major leaguers Dickey Pearce, George Hall and Fred Treacey, but by 1868 the best players had left for better pay.

The club did not join the first major league in 1871 and by the late 1870s, was no longer a baseball club, but simply a social club. An article in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle in 1893 makes this clear:

"In its origin the Excelsior Club is one of the oldest in Brooklyn, and its history has been continuous, although its character has essentially changed. It was organized as the Excelsior Base Ball Club on December 8, 1854, and while its name indicated the special object for which it came into existence the social element, which afterwards became dominant in the organization, had its recognized place. The club was incorporated under its original name in 1874. About that time, or soon after, its activity in athletic sports ceased and it became a purely social club, dropping the words "base ball" from its name in 1878. While the membership is comparatively small, it includes one of the best known club men in the city, and is largely made up of the younger men. There is a degree of social intercourse among the members that is peculiar to this one club, and it has been said that it resembles, socially, a college society more than it does the ordinary type of organization of its class..."

Peverelly's Early History of the Excelsiors

Here is Charles Peverelly's 1866 look at the early history of the Excelsiors (with additional scores unknown to Peverelly):

For this full and complete history of the Excelsior Club we are indebted to Van Brunt Wyckoff, Esq., a gentleman who has been connected with that crack organization for many years. While witnessing a game played November 10 or 17, 1854, between the Knickerbockers and Eagles, it occurred to John H. Suydam and several others, to "get up" a Base Ball  Club, and accordingly on Thanksgiving Day in November of that year they met for practice, but under no especial organization. They styled themselves the "J.Y.B.B.B.C's" (Jolly Young Bachelors' Base Ball Club). Soon after, Committees on Constitution and By-Laws, and on Grounds, were formed; and December 8, 1854, a formal meeting was held at Florence's Hotel, New York, when the report of the Committee on Constitution and By-Laws was read and adopted, and the name of "Excelsior" was proposed by Charles C. Suydam, and adopted; and those present, nineteen in number, proceeded to the election of officers (see below). The Excelsior Base Ball Club, of Brooklyn, was organized December 8, 1854. On October 6, 1857, the Wayne Base Ball Club consolidated with the Excelsior Base Ball Club.

Number of members, November 24, 1866: Active members, three hundred and fifty; life members, sixteen; honorary members, four. Total, three hundred and seventy. Of the original members, two remain connected with the club, as honorary members, viz. John H. Suydam, the father of the club, and Peter Van Schaack. Of those who were members (active) at the time of consolidation with the Wayne Base Ball Club, eleven exist, six of whom were Excelsiors and five were Waynes.


Games of 1856

October 8—Excelsiors and Putnams. Played on Excelsior's ground, corner of Smith and Degraw streets.
Excelsior, 16 runs; Putnam, 15 runs; six innings. Umpires, Wm. P. Dean, of Excelsior Club; Samuel Godwin, of Putnam Club. Referee, George A. Brown, of Knickerbocker Club.
October 25—Excelsiors and Putnams. Played on Putnam's ground, between Lee and Bedford avenues, Ross and Hewes streets, E.D. (Wheat Hill.) Excelsior, 15 runs; Putnam, 21 runs. Referee, J. Drummond, of Knickerbocker Club.

Games of 1857

July 14—Excelsiors and Putnams. Excelsior's ground. Excelsior, 20 runs; Putnam, 37 runs; eight innings. Referee, Charles E. Place, of Eagle Club.
September 16—Excelsiors and Unions. Union's ground, at Morrisania. Excelsior, 8 runs; Union, 30 runs; seven innings. Referee, Charles E. Place, of Eagle Club.
September 28—Excelsiors and Unions. Excelsior's ground. Excelsior, 41 runs; Union, 23 runs; eight innings. Referee, Thomas S. Dakin, of Putnam Club.

Games of 1858

June 10—Excelsiors and Putnams. Excelsior's ground. Excelsior, 18 runs; Putnam, 31 runs; nine innings. Umpire, James W. Davis, of Knickerbocker Club.
June 24—Excelsior and Eagle. Excelsior's ground. Excelsiors, 32 runs; Eagles, 13 runs; nine innings. Umpire, P. Sheridan, of Gotham Club.
July 8—Excelsior and Knickerbocker. Excelsior's ground. Excelsiors, 31 runs; Knickerbockers, 13 runs; nine innings. Umpire, Samuel Yates, of Eagle Club.
July 22—Excelsiors and Unions. Home-and-home game. Played on the Monumental's ground, at the Red House, Harlem. Excelsior, 30 runs; Union, 18 runs; nine innings. Umpire, E. McKinstry, of Putnam Club.
August 5—Excelsior and Harlem.Played on Harlem's ground, Mount Morris, One Hundred and Twenty-third street and Fifth avenue. Excelsior, 17 runs; Harlem, 17 runs; nine innings. Umpire, S. Clarke, of St. Nicholas Club.
August 20—Excelsior and Knickerbocker. Gotham's ground, Hoboken. Excelsiors, 15 runs; Knickerbockers, 14 runs; nine innings. Umpire, William H. Van Cott, of Gotham Club.
September 14—Excelsior and Gotham. Played on Gotham's ground, at Elysian Fields, Hoboken; Excelsiors, 24; Gothams, 13; 9 innings; Umpire, Thomas S. Dakin, of Putnam Club.
September 23—Excelsior and Pastime. Played on Pastime's ground, at Bedford, Long Island; Excelsiors, 43; Pastimes, 14; 9 innings; Umpire, Thomas S. Dakin, of Putnam Club.
September 28—Excelsior and Eagle. Eagle's ground, at Hoboken. Excelsiors, 36 runs; Eagles, 25 runs; eight innings. Umpire, William H. Van Cott, of Gotham Club.
October 8—Excelsior and Pastime. Played on Excelsior's ground; Excelsiors, 27; Pastimes, 11; 9 innings; Umpire, Thomas S. Dakin, of Putnam Club.
October 16—Excelsiors and Putnams. Putnam's ground. Excelsior, 15 runs; Putnam, 19 runs; 9 innings. Umpire, Norman M. Welling, of Knickerbocker Club.
Nov. 9—Excelsior and Atlantic. Excelsior's ground, between Smith, Hoyt, Carroll and President streets, near Carroll Park, South Brooklyn; Excelsiors, 10; Atlantics, 22; 9 innings; Umpire, Thomas S. Dakin, of Putnam Club.
Nov. 16—Excelsior and Atlantic. Atlantic's ground, at Bedford; Excelsiors, 6; Atlantics, 27; 6 innings; Umpire, J. McCosker, of Gotham Club.


The 1859 Excelsior Base Ball Club of Brooklyn.
That is Dr. Joseph Jones, president of the club, on the far left.

 

Games of 1859

May 12—Excelsior and Charter Oak of Brooklyn. Charter Oak's ground, between Smith, Hoyt, Sackett, and Degraw streets, South Brooklyn. Excelsiors, 17 runs; Charter Oaks, 18 runs; nine innings. Umpire, Peter O'Brien, of Atlantic Club.
June 9—Excelsior and Charter Oak of Brooklyn. Excelsior's ground. Excelsior's, 62 runs; Charter Oaks, 13 runs; nine innings. Umpire, A. J. Bixby, of Eagle Club.
June 18—Excelsiors, 46 runs; Neoshos. Played on Neosho's ground, at the head of United States avenue, near Fort Hamilton, L.I. Excelsiors, 46 runs; Neoshos, 11 runs; nine innings. Umpire, Peter O'Brien, of Atlantic Club.
June 30—Excelsior and Knickerbocker. Knickerbocker's ground, Hoboken. Excelsiors, 26 runs; Knickerbockers, 22 runs; nine innings. Umpire, A. J. Bixby, of Eagle Club; time of game, 1.27.
July 28—Excelsior and Baltic. Played on Baltic's ground, corner of Eighty-first street and Second avenue. Excelsiors, 30 runs; Baltic, 19 runs; nine innings. Umpire, S. Pinckney, of Union Club.
August 2—Excelsior and Knickerbocker. Excelsior's ground. Excelsiors, 20 runs; Knickerbockers, 5 runs; nine innings. Umpire, Peter O'Brien, of Atlantic Club; time of game, 1.50.
August 11—Excelsior and Baltic. Excelsior's ground. Excelsiors, 41 runs; Baltics, 16 runs; nine innings. Umpire, Caleb Sniffen, of Atlantic Club.
August 18—Excelsior and Pastime. Pastime's ground at Bedford; Excelsiors, 20; Pastimes, 12; 9 innings; Umpire, Caleb Sniffen, of Atlantic Club.
September 3—Excelsior and Star of Brooklyn. Star's ground, near Carroll park. Excelsiors, 12 runs; Stars, 17 runs; nine innings. Umpire, Peter O'Brien.
September 8—Excelsior and Eagle. Gotham's ground, Hoboken. Excelsior, 24 runs; Eagle, 20 runs; ten innings; tie on the ninth. Umpire, R.H. Thom, of Empire Club.
September 14—Excelsior and Empire. Gotham's ground at Hoboken; Excelsiors, 25 runs; Empires, 20 runs; nine innings; umpire, Henry Morrow, of Knickerbocker Club.
September 29—Excelsior and Gotham. Played on Excelsior's ground, foot of Court street, South Brooklyn; Excelsiors, 37; Gothams, 12; 9 innings; Umpire, M. E. Gelston, of Eagle Club.
October 5—Excelsiors and Unions. Union's ground, at Morrisania. Excelsior,15 runs; Union, 19 runs; nine innings. Umpire, Wm. H. Van Cott, of Gotham Club.
October 22—Excelsiors and Putnams. Excelsior's ground. Excelsior, 19 runs; Putnam, 17 runs; six innings. Umpire, Marvin E. Gelston, of Eagle Club.
October 25—Excelsiors and Unions. Excelsior's ground. Excelsior, 13 runs; Union 3 runs; nine innings. Umpire, Thomas S. Dakin, Putnam Club; time of game, 2.05.


The 1860 Excelsior Base Ball Club of Brooklyn.
Left to right: Thomas Reynolds, John Whiting, James Creighton, H. Polhemus, A. Pearsall, Ed Russell, Joe Leggett, Asa Brainard, George Flanly.


Games of 1860

May 15—Excelsior and Charter Oak of Brooklyn. Won by the Charter Oaks 12-11.
June 21
—Excelsior and Charter Oak of Brooklyn. Excelsior's ground. Excelsiors, 36 runs; Charter Oaks, nine runs; nine innings. Umpire, Andrew J. Bixby, of Eagle Club.
June 28—Excelsior and Star of Brooklyn. Excelsior's ground. Excelsiors, 16 runs; Stars, 5 runs. Umpire, Andrew J. Bixby, of Eagle Club.
Tour to Buffalo—June 30, 1860, the Excelsior Nine and others left for Albany. They were received by a delegation from the Champion Club of Albany, and registered at Stanwix Hall.
July 2—Excelsior and Champion, of Albany. Excelsiors, 24 runs; Champions, 6 runs; nine innings. After the game the Champions entertained their guests at the Merchant's Hotel.
July 3—Excelsior and Victory, of Troy. The Excelsiors were received by Dr. Hegeman, Robert Green, and others. Played on Victory's ground at Wier's Course, Troy. Excelsiors, 13 runs; Victories, 7 runs; nine innings. After the game the Excelsiors were well entertained at the "Troy House."
July 5—Excelsior and Niagara, of Buffalo—The Excelsiors were met by a delegation of the Niagara at the depot, and taken to the Mansion House. Excelsior, 50 runs; Niagara, 19 runs; 9 innings. Umpire, Frank P. Whiting, of Excelsior Club. The Excelsiors were escorted to Bloomfield's Hotel, where a splendid supper was provided. The Niagaras also went with them to Canada, to the Clifton House, where they were hospitably treated; and throughout, the attention shown the Excelsiors by their friends could not have been exceeded, and is remembered with the utmost pleasure.
July 7—Excelsior and Flour City, of Rochester. The Excelsiors were received by a delegation of the Flour City at the depot, and were conducted to the Osborne House.  Excelsior, 21 runs; Flour City, 1 run; 9 innings.
July 9—Excelsior and Live Oak, of Rochester. Excelsior, 27 runs; Live Oak, 9; 9 innings.
July 11—Excelsior and Hudson River, of Newburgh. The Excelsiors were received by Mr. Miller and associates, and conducted to the Orange Hotel. Excelsior, 59 runs; Hudson River, 14 runs; 9 innings.
July 19—Excelsior and Atlantic. Excelsior's ground; Excelsior's, 23; Atlantics, 4; 9 innings; Umpire, William Bane, of Pastime Club.
July 22—Excelsior of Brooklyn, and Excelsior of Baltimore. Excelsior of Brooklyn, 51 runs; Excelsior of Baltimore, 6 runs; 9 innings. The Excelsiors were entertained with true Southern hospitality. A magnificent dinner at Guy's, after the game, was partaken of, at which flowers in profusion decorated the tables' toasts and songs abounded. From 4 A.M. of Saturday, until 5 P.M. of Sunday, the Excelsiors of Brooklyn were occupied in one entire round of pleasure. Played at Camac Woods, Philadelphia. Excelsior, 15 runs; All Philadelphia, 4 runs; 9 innings.
August 4—Excelsiors and Putnams. Putnam's ground. Excelsior, 23 runs; Putnam, 7 runs; nine innings. Umpire, Peter O'Brien, of Atlantic Club.
August 9—Excelsior and Atlantic. Atlantic's ground; Excelsiors, 14; Atlantics, 15; 9 innings; Umpire, William Bane, of Pastime Club.
August 23—Excelsior and Atlantic. Putnam's ground, on Broadway; Excelsiors, 8; Atlantics, 6; 5 innings were played, when the game was drawn (due to rowdy fan behavior); Umpire, R.H. Thorn, of Empire Club.
August 25—Excelsior and Knickerbocker. Excelsior's ground. Excelsiors, 32 runs; Knickerbockers, 9 runs; nine innings. Umpire, C. A. Burtis, of Gotham Club.
September 1—Excelsior and Empire. Empire's ground, Hoboken; Excelsiors, 23 runs; Empires, 7 runs; nine innings; Umpire, Samuel W. Patchen, of Charter Oak Club.
September 7—Excelsiors and Unions. Home-and-home game. Played on the Union's ground, at Morrisania. Excelsiors, 7 runs; Unions, 4 runs; nine innings. Umpire, John Van Horn, of Baltic Club; time of game, 2.23.
September 15—Excelsior and Independent. Excelsior ground; Excelsiors, 46 runs; Independents, 14 runs; nine innings.
Excursion to Baltimore, Md., Friday, September 21—The Excelsior Nine and others, left for Baltimore, where they arrived at about four o'clock on Saturday morning, and were received by George Beam and associates, and taken to Guy's Monument House.
September 29—Excelsior and Empire. At Elysian Fields, Hoboken; Excelsiors, 23 runs; Empires, 7 runs, nine innings; Umpire, Andrew J. Bixby, of Eagle Club.
November 5—Excelsior and St. George's Cricket Club. St. George's Cricket ground, Hoboken; Excelsiors, 25 runs; St. George's Cricket Club, 0 runs; nine innings.

Games of 1861

No matches for Excelsiors during first year of the Civil War.

Games of 1862

June 26—Excelsior and Charter Oak of Brooklyn. Excelsiors, 20 runs; Charter Oaks, 19 runs; seven innings. Umpire, Peter O'Brien, of Atlantic Club. Excelsior and Neosho, of New Utrecht, Long Island.
Visit to Boston, July 9, 1862—The Excelsior nine and others left for Boston; received by a delegation of the Bowdoin Club, and conducted to the Tremont House.
July 10—Excelsiors and Bowdoin of Boston, played on "Boston Common." Excelsiors, 41 runs; Bowdoins, 15 runs; nine innings. After the game the Excelsiors were furnished a very splendid entertainment at the "Parker House," Mayor Wightman and other distinguished guests being present.
July 11—Excelsior and Lowell and Tri-Mountain, played on "Boston Common." Excelsiors, 39 runs; Lowell and Tri-Mountain, 13 runs; nine innings. Umpire, John A. Lowell, of Bowdoin Club. The Excelsiors were treated by the Bostonians in a very cordial manner.
July 26—Excelsiors and Unions. Unions' ground, at Morrisania. Excelsior, 4 runs; Union, 12 runs; six innings. Umpire, Louis F. Wadsworth, of Gotham Club.
October 14—Excelsior's ground, "foot of Court street," South Brooklyn. Excelsior, 13 runs; Union, 9 runs; six innings. This was the last game in which James Creighton played. He died Oct. 18, 1862, in the 22d year of his age.
October 4—Excelsior and Star of Brooklyn. Game made up in consequence of absence of Charter Oaks. Played on Excelsior's ground. Excelsiors, 5 runs; Stars, 5 runs; six innings played, when overtaken by darkness.

Games of 1863

June 15—Excelsior and Athletic, of Philadelphia. Excelsior, 17 runs; Athletic, 18 runs; ten innings.
August 3—Excelsior and Hudson River, of Newburgh. Excelsior, 16 runs; Hudson River, 13 runs; 9 innings.
August 15—Excelsiors and Unions. Home-and-home game, Excelsior's ground. Excelsiors, 9 runs; Unions, 20 runs; nine innings. Umpire, Richard J. Pearce, of Atlantic Club.
September 10—Excelsior and Newark, N.J., on the Newark's ground, at Newark, N.J. Excelsiors, 17 runs; Newarks, 10 runs; nine innings.
September 16—Excelsior and Henry Eckford, played on Henry Eckford's ground. Excelsiors, 26 runs; Henry Eckfords, 21 runs; nine innings.
September 23—Excelsior ground. Excelsiors, 19 runs; Newarks, 17 runs; nine innings.
September 30—Excelsior's ground. Excelsiors, 15 runs; Henry Eckfords, 8 runs; nine innings.
October 17—Excelsior and Eagle. Gotham's ground, Hoboken. Excelsior, 5 runs; Eagle, 6 runs; nine innings. Umpire, J. Seaver Page, of Active Club; time of game, 1.55.
October 20—Excelsior and Nassau of Princeton, N.J. Excelsior's grounds. Excelsiors, 11 runs; Nassau, of Princeton, 12 runs; nine innings.

Games of 1864

July 1864—Excelsior and Lowell, of Boston—Played on Capitoline ground, at Bedford. Excelsior, 39 runs; Lowells 31.
July 16—Excelsior and Enterprise. Capitoline ground, at Bedford. Excelsiors, 25 runs; Enterprise, 19 runs; nine innings.
August 10—Played on the Newark's ground, at Newark, N.J. Excelsiors, 24 runs; Newarks, 20 runs; nine innings.
August 13— Excelsior's ground. Excelsior, 33 runs; Enterprise, 6 runs; nine innings.
August 17—Excelsior and Mutual. Mutual's ground, at Hoboken. Excelsior, 10 runs; Mutual, 21 runs; five innings.
September 10—Excelsior and Mutual. Excelsiors ground. Excelsiors, 19 runs; Newarks, 35 runs; nine innings. Umpire, Peter O'Brien, of Atlantic Club.
September 13—One of the most remarkable games was played September 13, 1864, on the Excelsior ground, foot of Court street, South Brooklyn, between five members of Excelsior Club, and four members of other clubs on each side, in the remarkably short time of fifty-eight minutes; George H. E. Fletcher's side, 13 runs; Thomas S. Dakin's side, 6 runs; nine innings. This game is considered the shortest on record.
September 23—Excelsior and St. George Cricket and Picked Nine from New York. Played on St. George's cricket ground, at Hoboken. Excelsior, 28 runs; St. George's Cricket and New York Base Ball Club, 15 runs; nine innings.
September 26—Excelsior ground. Excelsior, 22 runs; Mutual, 33; nine innings.
October 1—Excelsiors and Unions. Excelsior's ground. Excelsiors, 8 runs; Unions, 6 runs; nine innings. Umpire, David A. Sutton, of Enterprise; time of game, 1.30.
October 8—Excelsiors and Unions. On the Union's ground, at Morrisania. Excelsior, 33 runs; Union, 26; seven innings. Umpire, F. Stevens, of Harlem Club.
October 11—Excelsior and Eagle. Excelsior's ground. Excelsiors, 32 runs; Eagles, 22 runs; nine innings. Umpire, John Chapman, of Atlantic Club; time of game, 2.40.
October 19—Excelsior and Newark. Played on Mutual's ground, at Hoboken. Excelsior's 27 runs; Newarks, 5 runs; nine innings.

Games of 1865

May 20—Excelsior and Pioneer, of Newark, N.J. Pioneer's ground. Excelsior, 14 runs; Pioneer, 32 runs; nine innings.
July 15—Excelsiors and Unions. At Morrisania. Excelsiors, 43 runs; Unions, 14 runs; nine innings. Umpire, Thomas S. Dakin, of Excelsior Club; time, 2.35.
September 15—Excelsiors and Unions. Played on the Capitoline ground, at Bedford. Excelsiors, 35 runs; Unions, 34 runs; nine innings. Umpire, William Dick, of Enterprise Club; time of game, 3.20.
September 26—Excelsior and Bedford. Capitoline ground, at Bedford. Excelsior, 46 runs; Enterprise, 21 runs; five innings.

Visit of Excelsior Club to Washington, Baltimore, and Philadelphia—The Excelsiors left for Washington, on Saturday P.M., October 7, 1865, and arrived at Washington on Sunday A.M., where they were received by a delegation of the National Club, who conducted them in carriages to Willard's Hotel.
October 9—Played on the President's (National's) ground, at Washington. Excelsior, 30 runs; National, 36; nine innings. After the game, the Excelsiors were sumptuously entertained by the Nationals at the National Hotel. On the following morning they left for Baltimore.
October 10—Played on the Pastime's ground, near Druid Park, on Madison avenue. Excelsior, 51 runs; Pastime, 22 runs; six innings. Umpire, Van Brunt Wyckoff, of Excelsior Club. The Excelsiors were received by a delegation of the Pastime Club, who escorted them in carriages to the Maltby House, where an excellent dinner was provided for them. It is worthy of remark that no money could be expended by the Excelsiors while in Baltimore. They left Baltimore in the 9.30 train for Philadelphia, quartering at the Girard House.
October 11—Played on Athletic ground. Excelsior, 11 runs; Athletic, 45 runs; nine innings.
November 11—Excelsior and Bedford. Capitoline ground, at Bedford. Excelsior, 43 runs; Enterprise, 16 runs; 9 innings. After the game, the members of both clubs proceeded to the St. James Hotel, where, at eight P.M., a large party sat down to an elegant supper.

Games of 1866

June 1—Excelsior and Harvard, of Cambridge College Mass. Capitoline ground; Excelsiors, 46 runs; Harvards, 28 runs; nine innings.
June 19—Excelsior and Star. Capitoline ground, Excelsiors, 27 runs; Stars, 20 runs; nine innings.
July 5—Excelsior and National, of Washington. Capitoline ground; Excelsiors, 46 ruins; Nationals, 33 runs; nine innings.
July 19—Excelsior and Union. At Morrisania, Excelsiors, 15 runs; Union, 20 runs; nine innings.
July 24—Excelsior and Contest, Capitoline ground. Excelsior, 34 runs; Contest, 5 runs; nine innings.
July 28—Excelsior and Active. Active's ground, at Hoboken. Excelsiors, 7 runs; Actives, 9 runs; five innings. Time of game, 1.25.
August 7—Excelsior and Peconic. Capitoline ground. Excelsior, 32 runs; Peconic, 4 runs; nine innings. Time of game 2.30.
August 14—Excelsior and Mutual. Capitoline ground. Excelsiors, 13 runs; Mutuals, 32 runs; nine innings. Umpire, Charles Wilson, of Empire Club; time of game 1.50.
August 17—Excelsior and National of Albany. Capitoline ground. Excelsior, 48 runs; National, 29 runs; nine innings.
August 24—Excelsior and Independent. Capitoline ground. Excelsior, 30 runs; Independent, 11 runs; eight innings. Time of game, 2.05.
August 28—Excelsior and Eureka, of Newark, N. J. Eureka's ground, at Newark, N. J. Eureka's ground, at Newark, N. J. Excelsior, 24 runs; Eureka, 12 runs; nine innings. Time of game, 2 hours.
September 4—Excelsior and Star. Capitoline ground. Excelsior, 32 runs; Star, 9 runs; nine innings. Time of game, 2 hours.
September 14—Excelsior and Enterprise. Capitoline ground. Excelsior, 16 runs; Enterprise, 18 runs; nine innings. Time of game, 1.50.

Tour to Washington, etc. September 15 to 22—On Saturday afternoon, September 15, 1866, between forty and fifty Excelsiors left for Washington. Near Baltimore they were met by a Committee of the National Club, and on their arrival at Washington a large delegation received them at the depot, and took them in carriages and stages to Willard's Hotel (on the morning of September 16), where choice rooms were provided for them. After breakfast, the entire party entered carriages and were taken by their guests to the Little Falls of the Potomac, and thence in the packet Minnesota to the Great Falls, where they were sumptuously feasted at the Pavilion Hotel. On Monday, September 17th, they were conveyed in carriages to the steamer Wawset for an excursion to Mount Vernon, the Lower Potomac, Indian Head, and Fort Washington. A select and fashionable assemblage of ladies accompanied them; also the Marine Band, led by Prof. Scala; a dirge was played by the band at the tomb of Washington, and at Fort Washington the commandant received them with military honors. Early in the evening they returned, and next they proceeded to Stagg's fine rooms, which were inaugurated on this occasion, and an elegant entertainment was provided for them.
September 18—Excelsior and National, of Washington, On the "President's Grounds." Excelsior, 33 runs; National, 28 runs; nine innings. On Wednesday, September 19th, the Excelsiors were given in charge of the Union Club of Washington. Excelsior and Union, of Washington.
September 19—Excelsior, 40 runs; Union, 23 runs; eight innings. In the evening the Unions entertained the Excelsiors hospitably at the National Hotel. Thursday morning, September 20, 1866, the Excelsiors left for Baltimore. On their arrival the Excelsiors were met at the depot by a committee of the Pastimes. After partaking of a lunch at a well provided table, they were escorted to the ball ground.
September 20—Excelsior and Pastime, of Baltimore. Excelsior, 28 runs; Pastime, 19 runs; nine innings. After the game the Excelsiors were taken to the Howard House. In the evening they were hospitably entertained at Chambaing's. On Friday morning the Excelsiors left for Philadelphia. Here they were met by a delegation of the Keystone Club. After a dinner at the Continental, the party left for the scene of action. Excelsior and Keystone of Philadelphia, September 21—Excelsiors, 18; Keystones, 18; 8 innings. In the evening the Keystones took the Excelsiors to Carncross & Dixie's Minstrel Hall, and paid them courteous attention. On Saturday the Excelsiors became the guests of the Olympics.
September 22—Played on the Olympic's ground; Excelsiors, 41; Olympic, 16; 9 innings. The treatment of the Excelsiors by the Olympics was most courteous, their reception of them laying the foundation of a permanent friendship. The Excelsiors left Philadelphia on the "Owl train," on Saturday night, Sept. 22, 1866, and arrived at home the following morning.

October 2—Capitoline ground; Excelsior, 30 runs; Union, 29 runs; nine innings.
October 22—Excelsior and Mutual. Played on the Mutual's ground at Hoboken; Excelsiors, 6; Mutuals, 23; 9 innings; time of game, 1 hour and 50 minutes.
November 3—Excelsior and Union. Union base ball ground, Brooklyn, E.D. Excelsior, 14; Union, 43; 9 innings. Umpire, Mills, of Atlantic Club; time of game 2 hours and 45 minutes.

 

Officers of the Excelsiors of Brooklyn

Officers elected for 1854—Jeremiah Nelson Tappan, President; Elisha Bacon, Vice-President; Frederick G. Eldridge, Secretary; Jonathan 0. Bartholomew, Treasurer; John H. Suydam, George T. Dalton, Robert J. Hubbard, Directors.
Officers elected April 17, 1855—Jeremiah 0. Bartholomew, President; Peter Van Schaack, Vice-President; J. Le Baron Willard, Secretary; P. Remsen Chadwick, Treasurer.
Officers elected April 5, 1856—James W. Andrews, president; John J. McLaren, Vice-President; Charles W. Thomas, Secretary; P. Remsen Chadwick, treasurer.
Officers elected April 1, 1857—P. Remsen Chadwick, President; Frederick S. Well, Vice-President; G. Henry Howell, Secretary; Henry M. Congdon, Treasurer.
The following officers were elected November 12, 1857—Joseph Bainbridge Jones, President; Joseph Bowne Leggett, Vice-President; G. Henry Howell, Secretary, to January 5, 1858; James B. Bach, Secretary, from January 5, 1858; Richard Oliver, Treasurer, to April 6, 1858; William H. Young, Treasurer from April 6, 1858; Joseph Bainbridge Jones, M.D., Joseph B. Leggett, and James B. Bach, Delegates to Convention, March 10, March 24, March 31, and April 7, 1858, when the "National Association of Base Ball Players" was organized (The title "National Association of Base Ball Players' was inserted in the Report of the Committee at the suggestion of Joseph B. Jones, M.D., President of The Excelsior Club.)
Officers elected January 14, 1859—Joseph Bainbridge Jones, M.D., President; Joseph B. Leggett, Vice-President; Gilbert Lawrence Haight, Secretary, to May 24, 1859; Wm. B. Kendall, Secretary, from May 24, 1859; Charles P. Gulick, Treasurer.
Officers elected January 3, 1860—Joseph B. Jones, M.D., President; J. Bowne Leggett, Vice-President; Wm. B. Kendall, Secretary; Charles P. Gulick, Treasurer.
Officers elected December 12, 1860—Joseph B. Jones, M.D., President; Joseph Ketchum, Jr., Vice-President; Charles L. Whiting, Secretary; Charles P. Gulick, Treasurer.
Officers elected January 17, 1862—Joseph B. Jones, M.D., President; Gilbert Lawrence Haight, Vice-President; William H. Holt, Secretary; Richard Oliver, Treasurer.
Officers elected March 12, 1863—Joseph B. Jones M.D., President, to Sept.9, 1863; Joseph B. Leggett, President, from Sept. 9, 1863; Charles P. Gulick, Vice-President; Wm. H. Holt, Secretary; Charles J. Holt, Assistant Secretary; Van Brunt Wyckoff, Treasurer.
Officers elected March 10, 1864—Joseph B. Leggett, President; Richard K. Cooke, Vice-President; Charles J. Holt, Secretary; Wm. H. Holt, Assistant Secretary: Van Brunt Wyckoff.
Officers elected March 9, 1865—Richard K. Cooke, President Charles P. Gulick, Vice-President; Charles J. Holt, Secretary, to May 11, when, by the Constitution, he became Recording Secretary; William H.. Holt, Assistant Secretary, to May 11, when he became Financial Secretary; Van Brunt Wyckoff, Treasurer.
Officers elected March 8, 1866—Joseph B. Jones, M.D., President; Richard Oliver, Vice-President; Chas. J. Holt, Recording Secretary; William H. Holt, Financial Secretary; William W. Kelly, Treasurer.

 

A series of friendly games played between the "old friends" of the Clubs in the years 1863, 1864, and 1865, as follows:
September 3, 1863—On Knick's ground, at Hoboken. Excelsior, 20 runs; Knickerbocker, 23 runs; nine innings.
September 22, 1863—Excelsiors ground. Excelsior, 45 runs; Knickerbocker, 56 runs; eight innings.
October 12, 1863—Knickerbocker's ground, at Hoboken. Excelsiors, 43 runs; Knickerbocker, 27 runs; nine innings.
July 21, 1864—Excelsior's ground. Excelsiors, 85 runs; Knickerbockers, 39 runs; eight innings.
Sept.22, 1864—Knickerbocker's ground, at Hoboken; Excelsiors, 48; Knickerbockers, 53; 9 innings.
July 6, 1865—Knickerbocker's ground, at Hoboken; Excelsiors, 28; Knickerbockers, 20; 9 innings.
July 25, 1865—Excelsior's ground, at Bedford, L.I.; Excelsiors, 60; Knickerbocker, 45; 9 innings.
Sept.21, 1865—Knickerbocker's ground, at Hoboken; Excelsiors, 17; Knickerbockers, 22; 9 innings.

 

Brooklyn Excelsiors Rosters
1856
C Stagg
P P. Chadwick
1B Congdon
2B Wells
3B Rogers
SS Andrews
OF Thomas
OF C. Etheridge
OF Dean
1857
C Joe Leggett
P C. Etheridge
1B William Young
2B Wells
3B James Rogers
SS R. Fleet
OF A. Markham
OF John Zuill
OF George Cole
A. Dayton
  P. Chadwick
Pomeroy
1858
C Joe Leggett
P A. Dayton
1B Ed Russell
2B Thomas Reynolds
3B William Young
SS George Cole
OF A. Markham
OF Samuel Kissam
OF John Holder
Bergen
  Wekks
C. Etheridge
1859
C Joe Leggett
P Ed Russell
1B A. Pearsall
2B H. Brainard
3B John Whiting
SS Thomas Reynolds
OF A. Markham
OF H. Polhemus
OF Charles Whiting
John Holder
  William Young
George Cole
  William Kendall
James Rogers
1860
C Joe Leggett
P James Creighton
1B A. Pearsall
2B John Holder
3B John Whiting
SS Thomas Reynolds
OF H. Polhemus
OF Ed Russell
OF Asa Brainard
George Flanly
  William Young
Henry Fairbanks
  B. Kimberly
Whiting
1862
C Masten
P James Creighton
1B Ed Russell
2B H. Brainard
3B H. Polhemus
SS George Flanly
OF George Cook
OF William Young
OF Asa Brainard
McKenzie
  H.P. Bostwick
Joe Leggett
  Jerold
1863
C Joe Leggett
P Asa Brainard
1B Whiting
2B John Clyne
3B George Cook
SS H. Brainard
OF George Flanly
OF Langley
OF McKenzie
1864
C H. Brainard
P Asa Brainard
1B George Fletcher
2B George Flanly
3B John Clyne
SS J. Patchen
OF Moore
OF Langley
OF Dakin
1865
  Herbert Jewell
P Asa Brainard
  George Flanly
George Fletcher
  John Clyne
J. Patchen
  James Mitchell
McCullough
1866
C Joe Leggett
P Asa Brainard
1B George Fletcher
2B Fred Crane
3B Frank Norton
SS George Flanly
OF John Clyne
OF James Mitchell
OF Anthony Elmendorf
Candy Cummings
  Dickey Pearce
Whitney
  Herbert Jewell
1867
C Herbert Jewell
P Candy Cummings
1B E. Thompson
2B George Flanly
3B Dan Chauncey
SS Bill Lennon
OF George Hall
OF John Clyne
OF Fred Treacey
James Mitchell
  George Cook
1868
  Anthony Elmendorf
Morrell
  George Cornwell
Milton Sweet
  James Mitchell
W.H. Murtha
  Dan Chauncey
Moore
1869
C C. Miller
P Tom Watts
1B George Chauncey
2B Benner
3B Don Chauncey
SS Dohrmann
OF Lockett
OF Thompson
OF Moore
Eddy
1870
C C. Miller
P Tom Watts
1B Eddy
2B George Chauncey
3B Thompson
SS Dohrmann
OF Milton Sweet
OF Lockett
OF Dan Chauncey
 
Brooklyn Excelsiors Rosters

NOTES:
Most of the statistical information and rosters come from Marshall Wright's groundbreaking book, The National Association of Base Ball Players 1857-1870 (see bibliography below) and Charles Peverelly's American Pastimes. Any "rosters" are compiled from surviving boxscores and/or Wright's book and may not be complete and players may have played at more positions than indicated. Accounts and boxscores come from many sources including the New York Times, the Brooklyn Eagle, the New York Clipper, and Spirit of the Times: A Chronicle of the Turf, Agriculture, and Field Sports. Information on years of NABBP membership are from Henry Chadwick's Base-ball Manual for 1871. Read more about our NABBP sources.

National Association of Base Ball Players sources/bibliography:
Baseball: The Early Years by Harold Seymour.
Baseball Before We Knew It: A Search For The Roots Of The Game by David Block.
Baseball in Blue and Gray: The National Pastime during the Civil War by George B. Kirsch.
Baseball (1845-1881): From the newspaper accounts by Preston D. Prem
But Didn't We Have Fun?: An Informal History of Baseball's Pioneer Era, 1843-1870 by Peter Morris
Early Innings: A Documentary History by Dean A. Sullivan
The National Association of Base Ball Players, 1857-1870 by Marshall D. Wright.
Playing for Keeps: A History of Early Baseball by Warren Goldstein.
When Johnny Came Sliding Home: The Post-Civil War Baseball Boom, 1865-1870 by William J. Ryczek

General Baseball History sources/bibliography:
Baseball: A History of America's Game
by Benjamin G. Rader.
Baseball: A Film By Ken Burns (PBS DVD)
The Formation, Sometimes Absorption and Mostly Inevitable Demise of 18 Professional Baseball Organizations, 1871 to Present by David Pietrusza.
The Great 19th Century Encyclopedia of Major League Baseball, 2nd Edition by David Nemec.
Early Innings: A Documentary History of Baseball, 1825-1908 by Dean A. Sullivan.
Middle Innings: A Documentary History of Baseball, 1900-1948 by Dean A. Sullivan.
Late Innings: A Documentary History of Baseball 1945-1972 by Dean A. Sullivan
Past Time: Baseball as History by Jules Tygiel
America's National Game: Historic Facts Concerning the Beginning, Evolution, Development and Popularity of Baseball by Albert Spalding
Total Baseball: The Ultimate Baseball Encyclopedia by John Thorn, et al.

 



Share Your Memories!

Our sites have always been by you and about you. If you check our TV Forums or our Technology & Science forums, you'll find literally thousands of messages from fans of 1970s TV shows, survivors of hurricanes or aircraft accidents, etc. from all over the world sharing their memories, asking questions, making comments. Our baseball section is new, but don't let that stop you from sharing your memories of the first game you went to, your favorite player, a now-forgotten stadium, etc. Of course you can also ask questions, post trivia, tell the world what you think of Barry Bonds, or just read what others are saying.

--Patrick Mondout



 

LEGGETT

Joe Leggett (pictured) deserves more credit than he has received for catching James Creighton's increasingly fast and lively pitches.


Excelsiors Collectibles!
Excelsiors Memorabilia!
Excelsiors cards!
Excelsiors Tickets!
Excelsiors Jerseys & Apparel!
Game Used Memorabilia!

Register on eBay for free today and start buying & selling with millions each week!

   
AS | Awards | Hall | Leaders | Leagues | Parks | People | Postseason | Seasons | Teams




Copyright 2004-2017, BaseballChronlogy.com. All Rights Reserved.
Use of this site is subject to our Terms of Service.
Privacy Statement

Logos and team names may be trademarks of their respective franchises or leagues. This site is not recognized, approved, sponsored by, or endorsed by Major League Baseball nor any sports league or team. Any marks, terms, or logos are used for editorial/identification purposes and are not claimed as belonging to this site or its owners.
Any statistical data provided courtesy of Retrosheet (see credits).